Sedbergh is a small, quiet market town nestling beneath the Howgill Fells, within the Yorkshire Dales National Park and close to the Lake District National Park. The town is perfectly situated for exploring either national park by car, bike or on foot. The immediate area has magnificent walking, road cycling and mountain biking opportunities, as well as kayaking, wild swimming, a beautiful golf course and more.

There is so much to enjoy in this elegant market town, with space to breathe and potter: a friendly approach to life; quirky shops (Sedbergh is England’s official Book Town so there are plenty of second-hand books to choose from); great pubs and local food and drink; comfortable places to stay to suit all tastes and budgets.

Sedbergh is mentioned in the Doomsday book, the name being derived from the Norse ‘Set Berg’ meaning ‘flat-topped hill’. The town was granted a market charter by Henry III in 1251 and Sedbergh School was founded here in 1525. In 1652 George Fox, founder of the Quakers, preached to a congregation of a thousand from a large rock known as Fox’s Pulpit on a local fellside. The historic Brigflatts, one of the best-known Quaker Meeting Houses, is situated a couple of miles from the town. St Andrew’s Church is the oldest building, dating from around 1130. It is the home to two fabulous embroideries created by local stitchers, depicting Sedbergh through the ages.

Farfield Mill, standing on the River Clough close to Sedbergh and once part of the extensive local woollen industry, is now a successful arts and heritage centre with regular textile and art exhibitions, artists’ and makers’ studios, shop and café.

So there’s lots to see and do, both indoors and out, and wonderful views all around. See sedbergh.org.uk or contact Sedbergh Information Centre on 015396 20125 / TIC@sedbergh.org.uk for more information.